Preliminary Schedule

The course will run 6 days a week for two weeks. There will be five key types of activities intermingled thought the course designed to maximise learning and scientific interactions:

  • Theoretical lectures. During these sessions we will introduce the basics of genome editing, its history, and theoretical considerations essential to anyone willing to embark in this type of experiments. These sessions will run mostly in the mornings and will be open to scientists not officially accepted in the course.
  • Laboratory practicals. These sessions are the essence of the course, it is during these practicals that students will acquire hands on experience and perform their own laboratory experiments under close supervision from experts in the field. This is the activity that will allow them to use genome editing tools back at their host institution, and to teach it to their colleagues. These sessions will run mostly in the afternoons, and will be strictly closed to the 20 selected participants.
  • Plenary research lectures. During these advanced lectures, faculty will give a talk about their research. This will allow students to be exposed to state of the art topics, and ask questions in a relaxed but formal setting, a unique opportunity given the high profile of the faculty selected. These sessions will take place in the evenings, and will be open to any scientists.
  • One-to-one project discussions. In these sessions half of the students will meet one-to-one with faculty members to discuss their projects and explore ways for improvement. In the meantime the other half will participate in a group discussion lead by one member of the faculty. The two halves will switch place the following day.
  • Student’s presentations. Through the course each student will have to prepare a presentation on a research proposal of his/her interest involving genome editing techniques. Each student will give a 10 minutes presentation at the end of the course, followed by 5 minutes questions. At the end a global wrap up of all presentations with personalised feedback from faculty members on the project and presentations skills will be given

Faculty

The various modules of the workshop will be taught by the following faculty (in alphabetical order):

Dr. Thomas Auer, Center for Integrative Genomics (CIG), University of Lausanne, Switzerland

Anne de Cian, Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle and TEFOR, France.

Dr. Jean-Paul Concordet. Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle and TEFOR, France.

Andrew Hammond, Imperial College, London, UK.

Dr. Jeremy Herren, International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (ICIPE), Nairobi, Kenya.

Prof. Dr. Daniel Masiga, International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (ICIPE) and Department of Biochemistry & Biotechnology, Kenyatta University, Nairobi, Kenya.

Dr. Tony Nolan, Imperial College, London, UK.

Dr. Lucia Prieto Godino, Center for Integrative Genomics (CIG), University of Lausanne, Switzerland.

Dr. Cristina Pujades, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain

Dr. Manuel Stemmer, Centre for Organismal Studies (COS), Heidelberg University, Germany.

Dr. Joachim Wittbrodt, Centre for Organismal Studies (COS), Heidelberg University, Germany.